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English 81
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)
CNN
Dec 23, 2012 8:00pm PST
ago, henry kissinger, then president nixon's national security advise secretly flew to china, beginning a string of meetings that would eventually open that isolated eastern nation to the western world. that opening checked soviet expansionism and in a sense was the beginning of the end of the cold war. >> this was the week that changed the world. >> it was also the beginning of china's entry into the world economy, which has resulted in that country becoming the world's second largest economy. >> red china's -- >> but back then, the idea of a reproachment with china would have been rejected as pure fantasy. china was a radical revolutionary communist regime that had been fighting america and its allies across the globe. how did the decision come about in the midst of such intense opposition? what were the internal maneuverings that paved the way? the secret dealings that made it actually happen? who better to ask than the man himself, dr. henry kissinger. >> this is what the world looked like when you enter into the white house with richard nixon. the united states has had n
MSNBC
Dec 25, 2012 5:00am PST
of having disliked richard nixon early and had a lot of quotations about it. and he suddenly, as faith in the public sector is falling in the early '70s, all the examples you're talking about with truman are looking better and better. a president who, as evan wrote about the wise men, he was the popular embodiment of an american willingness to project power and to stand guard over a really complicated dark world. >> by the way, during the mid'70s, also, even chicago, the band chicago had a song, "america's calling harry truman, harry, you know what to do." so it does go back -- >> are you two going to sing together? >> going to have a whole show on songs. >> but let's talk about the presidency of the modern era starting with jfk. jfk, of course, assassinated. that's how he leaves office. lbj, a completely distraught, broken man, which i still am haunted by the scene that doris paints as he's there begging this young woman to just come work with him. nixon, of course, leaves broken. after that, ford leafs broken, choked up. the morning after his wife has to speak for him. jimmy carter l
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 2:00pm EST
. it didn't have to be on the budget. that was long as a very good thing. in came the nixon administration. surely republicans would support the idea of getting the government out of the mortgage business. not so fast. the nixon people didn't want to let go. they noticed that the president of fannie mae was a democrat. he had been a big contributor to edmund brown, helping brown to defeat nixon to become governor of california in 1962. nixon still remembered that. one of the early dirty tricks of the nixon white house was finding a way to get rid of ray. nixon's housing secretary was george romney whose son has been in the news lately. mitt romney's dad complained ray was not being cooperative. he felt he could run fannie mae any way he saw fit. there was also talk that ray might have used fannie mae posted your letter head to raise money for democratic candidates and the white house was getting complaints from republican lawyers in south carolina that democratic lawyers were getting all the fannie mae work related to foreclosures, all the fees. in nine months of taking office nixon hired
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 6:00am EST
that works terribly well at this point. to correct what did you think of richard nixon when you worked with him? >> i liked him better after i was not working for him and he was out of the presidency. i kept up with him quite a bit. if obviously a very intelligent man, a man with enormous personal problems in terms of relating to people. i've understand much better, which i did not at the time when i worked for him, how he was not an effective administrator and how he could not keep all of those words in the can, whether you are talking about the administration or a special watergate. >> how did you keep up with him during the years after she was president? >> he read one of my books in the early 1980's which he liked and somehow or other if we started having correspondence again. then he gave me a number of parties and i with the maximum four time a year. his office was in new york and in new jersey. when i would go from washington to our house in connecticut, sometimes i would stop and see him. and we would discuss politics and we would discuss some of the things that had not been ab
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 8:00pm EST
. >> what did you think of richard nixon when you worked with him? >> i liked him better after i wasn't working with him and he was out of the presidency. he is a very intelligent man, a man with the enormous personal problems in terms of relating to people. and i understand much better, which i did not a time when i worked for him, how he was not an effective administrator and how he couldn't keep all those worms in the can, whether you are talking about the administration or special watergate pierre >> had been to keep up with him after the years that he was president? >> he read one of my books from the early 1980's that feel like. somehow, we started having correspondence again. i would see him max for times of year. his office was up in new york and then in saddle river, new jersey. so when i would go from washington to our house in connecticut or sometimes i would stop and see him. and we would discuss politics and some of the things that had not been the school -- had not been discussedable before. >> did you ever get in setting to watergate and how that happened? >> i think i
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 1:00am EST
things more in terms of one person. through the whole journey of frost nixon, his relationship which garn in a small theater in london, then broadway, then a movie. the very first preview performance of frost nixon in a theater in london, the entire back row was lawyers, the third preview david there was having been given the all clear or told you should go see it yourself and he was shaken by it to begin w. for a man who is incredibly generous and warm and positive and supportive of everything, i think he felt very confused by how he should react to this. and as the whole thing went on as it started to become clear this was going to be a massive hit in terms of the play and the theater version of it, he started to get behind it because he's a very good business man and he started to go, well, okay, there is a certain amount of this i don't believe actually happened and is not true and we have someone in the audience who knows a lot more about it but i think he made a judgment call which was and i think this is the same with the agencies whoever is working on it and who is being represent
MSNBC
Dec 25, 2012 4:00am PST
. if you look at the picture of him and nixon back in '47 when they were freshman together in the house, nixon's taller than him. and then you see the picture, they are there down in florida in the electionn '60 and he's taller than nixon. it's so strange. he just got healthier and nixon. and poor nixon is watching this guy grow next to him and i don't think he can believe what happened to this guy. >> was he a great president as far as what he accomplished? >> he had three years before he was killed. and if you go in terms of inspirati inspiration, did he lead people into politics, i would put him in the same category as hemingway. think about hemingway and the way he lived and he made all of us want to be writers. all of us wanted to be writers because of hemingway. he is the american writer. and that power of leadership is what kennedy had. he had made all of us growing up in that generation, everybody since, want to get into politics. before jack kennedy went into pl politics, it was stiff guys with three-piece suits, bob taft, nixon, guys that were really boring and who wanted to b
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 7:00pm EST
father, his secretary, and the secret service agent who installed it. that is until president nixon made infamous. [applause] of the presidential recording systems were revealed. against the backdrop of watergate, taping can seem problematic. but it is a unique and invaluable resource. on these tapes, history unfolds real-time in the most dramatic possible way. here are the confrontations of the civil rights movement and the life decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. people often ask me why my fatherfather install the systems. as a lover of history, i know he would've been talk of this new technology as a way of keeping an accurate record of events for the memoir he planned to write after leaving office. after the bay of pigs, people say he wanted to be able to remember who said what in case they later changed their tune. [laughter] the wonderful thing about this book is that although much of this material has been available, it has not been easily acceptable until now. the original recordings of of varying quality, and it is not always clear who is speaking in meetings.
MSNBC
Dec 24, 2012 12:00pm PST
out of steam. >> november 1972, after two weeks of re-election, president nixon told reporters, my study of elections in this country is that second terms almost inevitably are downhill. yes, richard nixon said that in '72. >>> after a string of legislative successes in the first term and after narrowly winning a second term as president, president bush claimed a mandate. >> when you win, there is a feeling that the president have spoken and in embraced your point of view and that's what i intend to tell the congress. i earned capital in the campaign, political capital and now i intend to spend it. >> spend it he did. bush made this stark ambition to the press corps. >> just after the 2004 election, you seemed to have claimed a really enviable capital. would you make that claim today that -- >> i'd say i'm spending that capital on the war. >> not only did plummeting support for the war erode the ability to drive the second-term agenda but overreached. the efforts on immigration reform collapsed under the weight of the other issues. the administration bungled the response to hurrica
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 3:00pm EST
, his enemies had their one chance. as did richard nixon and henry kissinger. their one chance to get rid of this man. and instead of trying to protect himself, the documents, the records show without a doubt that bud zumwalt relished this opportunity to finally take on publicly his opponents. and for once and for all, put the racists in their place. it was a harrowing experience for him. he was this close to losing his job. and, indeed, if henry kissinger had played his cards right, perhaps history would have been changed. but it didn't happen. but bud relished that fight, and the documents show that. he relished it for one simple reason. throughout his whole life, something i've learned from reading the materials, and i'll talk about what materials i used in a moment and the problem i had getting some of those materials, but he believed in this really simple axiom which if in your heart you believe it's right, t worth fighting for -- it's worth fighting for, you know? and that doesn't happen too often in the our public n our public realm. and it mattered to his sailors, and i tell t
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 4:15pm EST
family in the 60s and 70s and made the reagan democrats. first they were nixon democrats, people live who voted for john f. kennedy voted for nixon in 70-72. one of them was my mother. she stopped telling us who she was voting for. said there was a secret ballot. so my father and i knew that meant she probably noted -- voted for nixon. what i saw trying to piece together what happened in my family, my father stated died in the wall civil-rights liberal and my mother although i don't think she ever called herself a republican was a little ashamed of voting for nixon did, there was a sense of fear, the unraveling, the movement of the 60s were fantastic and a lot of us in this room, something else that happened in the 60s was there was a lot of turmoil. we saw a change in the economy we didn't recognize coming and people were able to mistake racial change and social change for why jobs for these working-class men were going away. i saw in my own family that my mother, one brother was in new york city cop and one was a firefighter, they were working in the increasingly dangerous city and ther
CNN
Dec 23, 2012 6:00pm PST
taiwan as the true china, and now richard nixon as a traitor. >> when nixon did it, do you think he felt that he would manage to calm the right down? or was it a price he was willing to play? >> it was the price he was willing to pay. >> this was the week that changed the world. >> richard nixon said when he went to china with you, of course, in '72, the week that he was there, he said this is the week that changed the world? >> he was right. >> well, those were some of the tough decisions we wanted to analyze. do you agree with the choices these people made? what are the toughest decisions you have made? join in the conversation online. #toughdecisions on twitter or cnn.com/fareed. we'll highlight the most interesting ones on our website. thank you for joining us tonight. we hope your decision to watch our show was not a tough one. >>> tonight, the one and only barbra streisand. ♪ and the way we were >> extraordinary hour. the legendary superstar. >> those men are fighting for your right to make any kind of picture you want. >> her incredible career. >> i only began to sing becau
CNN
Dec 30, 2012 8:00am PST
richard nixon has. >> when richard nixon did it, do you think he felt he would manage to calm the right down or a price he was willing to pay? >> it was a price he was willing to pay. >> this was the week that changed the world. >> richard nixon said when he went to china with you, of course, in '72, the week that he was there, he said this is the week that changed the world. >> he was right. >> well, those were some of the tough decisions we wanted to analyze. do you agree with the choices these people made? what are the toughest decisions you have made? join in the conversation online #toughdecisions on twitter. we'll highlight the most interesting ones on our website. thank you for joining us tonight. we hope your decision to watch our show was not a tough one. >>> it's extremely unlikely in my estimation that david gregory is going to jail. but the "meet the press" moderator is under investigation for wielding this particular prop during an interview with the head of the nra. >> so, here is a magazine for ammunition that carries 30 bullets. now, isn't it possible that if w
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:15am EST
first lady in 1961 and pat nixon who was the outgoing wife of the vice president at that time. another thing that takes place on inauguration day when there is a change of power is that by tradition field going president leaves a note for his successor. this is the note, this is the large envelope that was left in the oval office by george w. bush for barack obama. he just put a posted with 44 and the inside of it was another envelope that said to 44 from 43. and then the next morning here is a picture of barack obama reading that actual note. the procession to the capitol is always a big deal. here's a picture from exactly 100 years ago. an open carriage, and that is william howard taft on the right and the new president woodrow wilson on the left. in 1933 we have a situation with franklin d. roosevelt and herbert hoover. the two of them didn't get along so well. there wasn't a lot of conversation during the right to the capitol. in many pictures the were taken that day, roosevelt can be seen leading to the crowd or smiling to the crowd or turning toward hoover and trying to have a co
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 1:00pm EST
president nixon made white house taping it famous and infamous and other presidential recording systems were revealed. against the backdrop of watergate, the concept of taping can seem problematic, but it is beyond doubt that this is a unique and invaluable historical resources. on these tapes, history unfolds in real time in the most dramatic, possible way. we hear the confrontations of the civil rights movement and the life and death decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy on the 1962 recordings of the late president in the oval office. that this tonight as we continue through the holiday on c-span2. >> the west virginia state society honored senator robert byrd last month. the longest living senator in history, robert died in -- robert byrd died in 2010. we will hear from two of his staffers. >> the first speaker is ira shapiro. author of "the last great senate." he played important roles in foreign intelligence surveillance and the completing of the metrorail system. during the clinton administration, he served as a leading u.s. trader and earned the ran
MSNBC
Dec 28, 2012 6:00pm PST
% approval rating, unpopular. richard nixon during watergate in 1984, 24% approval. also very popular. banks that had just crashed the global financial system and were throwing tens of millions of people out of work worldwide, 23% approval, not good. paris hilton, 15% approval. the u.s. becoming a communist country, which had apparently been polled by rasmussen got 11% approval, oddly. and then there was congress. 9%. 9% approval rating. that is not good, people. that was in 2011. now, according to gallup, congress is up to 18%. that is still awful. and even the people who serve in congress don't like congress, they hate congress. they are embarrassed by it. just listen to them. >> we have lacked the courage to face up, to deal with these issues. we here in washington are going to hurt the american economy. we're going to hurt americans at every level, and to me, it's just a travesty that we've not been willing to deal with this issue. >> americans believe congress is broken. the american people know, democrats and republicans, that this place isn't working and there need to be some changes.
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:25pm EST
division from president nixon through presidents of both political parties to president obama. his nomination has also received a letter of support signed by each chair of the section on antitrust law of the american bar association, who has served as chair of that section between 1977 and 2011. so 29 of the most practitioner d proketicianers of antitrust -- practitioners of antitrust law have written in support of this nomination. and i just wanted to take this opportunity then -- it really is an honor to not just thank the president for this nomination but really to thank bill baer for being willing to leave a quite successful law practice to return to service of our country in an area that's critically important to our free-market economy in which he happens to be one of our nation's foremost experts. so i hope my colleagues will support the nomination of bill baer when it comes to a vote very soon this afternoon. i thank the chair and yield the floor. mr. shelby: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from alabama. mr. shelby: mr. president, i would like too tak to t
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:00am EST
" which is about how things in this life tend to line up. ♪ oh, i remember richard nixon in 1974 ♪ staff lined up just to say goodbye tiny tear, he said nobody knows me nobody understands i'm going to shake some hands somebody lined them up line 'em u line 'em all up ♪ >> not really a song about nixon. it was fascinating to watch him on camera. he was at the podium saying goodbye, farewell. then he had a staging problem. i was interested in how they handled it. nixon did not have a great walker. if you have seen those depictions of the evolution of man --\[laughter] coming from the primordial ooze and slowly walking on all fours and then finally ending on the extreme with cro-magnon man walking along, analyzing everything. nixon's walk was a couple of characters back from that guy. they did not want to focus on it. so they lined up all of the employees and he went down the line like a receiving line, saying goodbye to all of them. it was quite moving, saying hello and goodbye for the first and last time. and then at the end of the line he was on the helicopter and out of there. thi
CBS
Dec 30, 2012 6:30am EST
resolutions. ♪ [ music ] >>> new years resolutions, pat. >> get at list one book on nixon done this year. >> another one? >> one. >> can get cracking on my memoir, and also continue to jog so i can continue to stay healthy and continue to do combat. >> ensure that everything i put on twitter is completely accurate. >> are you going to do a memoir? >> no. >> really? >> write a book that responds to pat buchanan's last book. >> my new year's resolution is to not have such a heavy foot when i accelerate vehicles. we try to give it to you straight. celebrate the new year. bye bye. ♪ [ music ]
CBS
Dec 30, 2012 8:00am EST
the vietnam war and ultimately moving to impeach president nixon over the watergate scandal. our next guest ira shapiro is the author of "the last great senate:courage and statesmanship in tames of crisis." welcome to the program. >> nice to be here. >> why do you call it the last great senate? >> well, because from the early 'sick through about 1980 we had a senate that was in the forefront of everything that was going on in the country, and accomplished a great deal. the senate of humphrey, muskee, baker, ted kennedy, many other great americans. and we haven't had a senate like that for the last 30 years. i don't mean it's the last great senate we'll ever have, but we haven't had one since. >> why the decline, do you think, from that caliber of political leadership that we had in that era? >> a lot of reasons. first, it's actually harder to be a senator in this day and age of campaign finance demands. lobbying corps that's grown five-fold, 24-hour media. it's a much more difficult situation. but the real key is that the senate was not a partisan institution, the great senate. bipartisansh
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:00pm EST
until the 1970s when nixon runs against jfk in 1960, nixon brings out researchers. he hires researchers all over the country to find every bit of dirt they can about the kennedy family. they find plenty of dirt about kennedy, but no one accuses him of being a bootlegger. it's only in the 1970s when writers are trying to figure out the assassination and the figure can't be also. it's got to be the mafia. by what the mafia co. after jfk and these explanations are put together and all sorts of retired mafia. and israel, in europe, in the bahamas they'll come out when asked out when asked and say joe kennedy was a good friend of mind. we did a lot of work. and writers with a good story wouldn't let it go. i booty instead, trying to track down every rumor, every story. and you know, the credible witnesses include all components pni tuner, who gives an interview in which he says he was tuning a piano when alan kennedy met together. they include the ex-wife of a chicago mobster who says yeah, my husband was a good friend of joe kennedy. they included the people who came out of the woodwork to
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 1:00am EST
. -- a different way. those days before nixon's resignation, what was the atmosphere like for you with the expectation and the pressure and the rumors and all that? >> to put it in perspective, i was a senior in high school at the time. you know, the way my dadwe weree did things differently. [laughter] i guess that is the best way to put it. dad never talked about it to the family until it was literally the last minute. he was one of those people if you told him this is a secret. do not repeat it. he did not. he kept it totally to himself. i think maybe he said something to my mother, but other than that, us children had no idea. in new because the news media was saying president nixon is going -- you knew it because the news media was saying president nixon is going to resign. you did not have the news media like today so it was very different. we had news media waiting in our front yard for something to happen. so, it was one of those things that dad did not say something until the very last minute. yes, we are going to the white house and we need to pick out clothes. [laughter
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 11:00pm EST
the country has changed in a good way. but right after richard nixon became president, for vacancies appeared on the supreme court. jimmy carter is the only president in american history but to the full term without a single they consider greater richard nixon was only president for five years and he had to leave early, remember? [applause] but he got four appointments to the supreme court. they were replaced by richard nixon with chief justice warren burger. blackmun, and william rehnquist. as a think about that list, has a very important part of the oath. but it is american politics over the past generation. and that is the evolution of the republican party. it is the most important story in american politics. it is the most important story in the supreme court. because moderate republicans dominated the supreme court moderate republicans are gone and the supreme court and the united states congress, our i inspector is fighting for his life now, i had the privilege of covering senator specter who is a great character. often during his tenure in the senate, he left the republican party liter
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:00am EST
belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that are critical in the politics that develop, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative task to them. they tended to be oriented around history of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt, in the south and southwest that we see the rise of what we see by the 1970s is becoming to talk about as the religious right, the rise of evangelical involved in the clinical process in new and important ways. so thurmond was at the forefront of all of those issues in his own politics. national defense, he was a staunch anti-communist. he played an important role
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:45pm EST
nixon was president. and i think that nixon was hoping to get a vacancy on the court and so one day, one of marshall's doctors came to him and said, the president has requested to send over your medical record. he had pneumonia. you know, he was very sick. and he said, of course he can send him over, but let me just right on the record with a black sharpie parker. and he wrote not that come exclamation point. [laughter] >> by most accounts, he was a terrible man to work for. one story that i have about douglas is about if he had written a u.s. reporter or something. the young man denied it. douglas is just humbly with rage and saying that books are temples. i would never trust a person who would write in person who would write an in a book written douglas takes the book and flips it under his window. and he throws it to heart and it goes out the window and lands in the courtyard outside and cracked the spine. and the center for second, and then the law clerk makes hst and check hasty exit about how he treats books. [laughter] >> david souter and stephen breyer are frequently together. no
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 8:30am EST
whatsoever. the only, the stories about bootlegging don't begin until the 1970s. when nixon run against jfk in 1960, nixon brings out researchers, he hires researchers all over the country to find every bit of dirt they can about the kennedy family. and they find plenty of dirt about joe kennedy, but no one accuses him of being a bootlegger. it's only in the 1970s when writers are trying to figure out the assassination and they figure it can't be oswald, it's got to be the mafia, but why would the mafia go after jfk? and these explanations are put together. and all sorts of retired mafia, can you retire as a mafia person? [laughter] some of, you know, in the miami, in israel n in europe, in the bahamas, they all come out when asked, and they say, oh, yeah, joe kennedy was a good friend of mine, we did a lot of work. and writers, you know, seeing a good story wouldn't let it go. you know, and i'm reading this stuff trying to track down every rumor, every story, and, you know, the credible witnesses include al capone's piano tuner? [laughter] who gives an interview in which he says he was tun
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:00pm EST
kennedy had been protestant we would have gotten 54, 55% against nixon. congressional democrats got 55% of the vote in 1960. jack kennedy got 51% of the vote. millions of white protestants who otherwise voted democrat did not vote for jack kennedy because he was a catholic. kennedy's presidency changed i think the dynamics of electoral politics, national electoral politics in this country because whether you like kennedy or not, whether you are going to vote for him if he lived in 1964 or not, it became abundantly clear during his presidency that he had made his decisions for himself based on the constitution of what was best for the united states. there wasn't the pope calling and saying do this, do this, do this. it sounds ridiculous. now but there were millions of people and there were some very important protestant leaders including billy graham who said do not vote for a catholic because the catholic is less, a catholic is in the agencies and i think the kennedy presidency change that. >> okay, the day of reckoning -- >> joseph kennedy's attitude and his own and anti-semitism do y
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 7:00am EST
agent who installed it. that is until president nixon made the idea of white house taping famous and infamous -- [laughter] and other presidential recording systems were revealed. against the backdrop of watergate, the concept of secret taping can seem problematic. but it is beyond doubt that this is a unique and invaluable historical resource. on these tapes, history unfolds in real-time in the most dramatic possible way. we hear the tense confrontations of the civil rights movement and the life-or- death decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy joins "listening in" editor ted widmer in a discussion on the 1962 recordings of the late president in the oval office, tuesday evening at 7:00, as "book tv" continues through the holiday on c-span2. >> i was 9 and i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay, who was running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party. [laughter] i was handing out leaflets on a street corner in new yor
FOX Business
Dec 25, 2012 8:00pm EST
of man all of the people on this earth are truly watching. >> president nixon had planned two different speeches one if you succeeded as you did and one if you didn't. fa other gain -- ordained the men who went to the moon she's brave men kneel arm stro-- neil armstrong know there is no hope in recovery but they know there was hope in mankind for their sacrifice. >> they were worried about how they would take it. >> there are pioneers. it was doing something that hadn't been done before. >> they splashed down into the pacifijuly 249, 1969. the space race was over. stars and stripes were still there. >> coming up, in the 1960s there was a hitv show lost in space and a movie marooned. as long as humans dreamed of exploring the heavens they shuddered at the possibility of never getting back. for the astronauts of apollo [girls laugh, bell rings] - whatever. - he asked me right before school started. - no way! - hi. - hi. - ♪ shine, come on and let it shine ♪ ♪ light me up-- - hi. >> if i told you next week or next month or next year americans would be landing on the moon. how huge wo
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 9:00am EST
of the alternative history things, what if nixon had been kennedy in 1960? what if john kennedy had never been president? thinking of all the thousands of books that never would have been written or may be different books written. i once interviewed caroline kennedy who edited a simple book career mother was writing mostly and tapes from the white house, caroline kennedy is famous for staying on message and talking about certain things but not other things, tend to get off message. have you ever thought about a kennedy bookstore. she would not say anything about it. it is possible to have an entire book store devoted to the kennedys, a serious history, arnold schwarzenegger's book could be there as well. he tells the story going back -- he and maria shows in the house, in los angeles, hollywood. joseph kennedy would appear for a while and there was a tunnel underneath the house to gloria swanson's house and he said maria was the most interested and embarrassed by this story. i asked donald why he put that in the book. he didn't really answer the question. >> here's a question. kennedy's book s
FOX News
Dec 24, 2012 1:00pm PST
but no man had set foot on moon and when president nixon he was not to let the soviets get there first. the next leg of the space race was a series of sprints. >> we launched saturn every two months, just remarkable. >> that got them closer, with apollo 9, in march of 1969. it was the first to test the module in space. apollo ten in may of 1969, that was from 50,000 feet of the moon surface. that what a dress rehearsal for the landing of apollo 11 commanded by neil armstrong. >> what are the plans in the event that it does not come up? >> well, we have chosen not to think about that. >>neil: the other two crew members were michael collins and buzz aldrin who would walk on the moon with article strong. >> a lot of gossip back and forth about how it ended up kneel am strong was the first. but you were supposed to be, right? >>guest: in was an uncertainty and the senior person has the responsibility for much more requirement, it it would seem the outside activity should be the job of the junior person. >>neil: who was that supposed to be? you? armstrong? who? >>guest: there is a lot of di
FOX News
Dec 28, 2012 10:00pm PST
of the team in the biggest media market in the country and led the new york nixon this terrific winning streak. petered out a little bit. still needs to work on turnovers. having mixed success in houston. that was sentimentally that was my favorite story of the year. >> greta: for 2013, pay attention to africa. you mentioned the arab spring but i think africa is and what is going on there will be huge in 2013. >> the military is aggressive there and doing more drone work and worried about al-qaeda. good news from there, too, but it is an important place to watch. >> greta: i always bush on greta wire what is going on in sudan. the president is killing his people and sooner or later people will catch on to the story because it is brutal what he is doing. >> and the congo is the most violent place on earth unfortunately. >> greta: a lot of competition there for violent places. happy new year. >> greta: and coming up for the second time this week much of the country bracing for severe weather. is the new storm headed towards you? the latest on its track is next. plus, well, you can't see this vid
FOX News
Dec 29, 2012 5:00pm PST
, you would have to go back probably to richard nixon. if you look at gerald ford and ronald regan was clearly a social conservative and put it front and center. george bush in his first term was and then in the second term was defeated. bob dole, john mccain, mitt romney. >> case closed. >> maybe that's not the right way, but -- boy that's the way the media has portrayed it. >> let me add a little color commentary there. let's go back to when you were a candidate for president. >> i knew you were going to bring that up, that painful memory of where that went. >> well we are sitting here because you had a platform that people connected with. you had a campaign with little resources. you fast-forward a few years to the candidate who had a similar message in this last election cycle, rick santorum. again, the same story. no resources, no backing from the establishment, but who almost captured the nomination. same case as you. it was that message that people were motivated by and engaged over. >> were there fewer evangelicals voting this time than four years ago? >> that was the chall
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